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Dutch Zoo Tests 'Tinder for Orangutans' Mating ProgramThink of it like online dating, but for primates: A Dutch zoo is using a series of photographs on a screen to help one orangutan kick off the mating process. Breeding programs often involve international partnerships and long-distance travel of potential mates, so the Apenheul primate park in Apeldoorn, Netherlands, recently launched a four-year experiment dubbed "Tinder for orangutans." Rather than hope for the best once a male arrives at the zoo, researchers are first presenting pictures of the potential mates to a female orangutan to see how she reacts. "Often, animals have to be taken back to the zoo they came from without mating," Thomas Bionda, a behavioural biologist at the zoo,
A sign reads When military advances began in Mosul, Nour Park was turned from a home for monkeys, horses and other animals into a staging ground for Islamic State. There was a guard that used to come and feed them," the park's owner, who gave his name only as Abu Omar, told Reuters. Volunteers sent by the Kurdistan Organization for Animal Rights Protection brought the first substantial amounts of food to the former zoo in a month.
In this June 21, 2008, photo provided by the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, a whitetip shark swims off Cat Island in the Bahamas. The National Marine Fisheries Service said in December 2016 that the sharks are likely to become endangered. Threats to the sharks include fishing pressure all over the world, as their fins are prized in Asian markets for use in soup. (Neil Hammerschlag/University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science via AP)PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The oceanic whitetip shark's declining status in the wild warrants listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, an arm of the federal government has determined.
This image released by the Smithsonian National Zoo in 2013 shows a female bobcat named OllieAfter an elusive feline from Washington's National Zoo triggered a three-day cat hunt -- and an online sensation -- Ollie the bobcat on Wednesday ventured home on her own terms. Ollie ultimately turned up near the zoo's bird house, where keepers successfully captured her and took her for a checkup with veterinarians. "We're just over the moon happy," said Craig Saffoe, curator of big cats at the zoo.
Scientists are now spotting whales from outer space using satellitesA humpback whale may be a huge creature to the human eye, but they're still tough to spot from space. Until recently, the necessary high-resolution satellite technology wasn't readily available, but researchers in Western Australia are beginning to use satellite imagery to check on the size of local populations. SEE ALSO: Forget telepresence robots on wheels, Google wants telepresence drones The aim of the project is to keep tabs on Western Australia's humpback whale numbers, explained Curt Jenner, managing director of the Centre for Whale Research. "The goal of the project is ultimately to make sure this population of humpback whales, which has always historically been the largest in the world, is still viable and has recovered to its full potential," he said. The animals were hunted almost to extinction in the early to mid 20th century. While projects like this were able to find government and corporate funding in the past, that money has increasingly dried up as whale numbers rebound, Jenner said, forcing he and his research partner on this project, Michele Thums, to find a new solution. Satellite imagery of whales migrating. Image: Curt Jenner "There are no longer any budgets to send aerial survey teams of people up in planes nor people out in boats to do that population monitoring, and so we were looking for an economical solution that was low in man power," he said.
Tsar, a rare tigress-lion crossbreed liger cub, drinks about a litre of goat's milk a dayRostov-on-Don (Russia) (AFP) - His name is fit for a king, and he's being treated like one: Tsar the liger cub, born from an extremely rare lion-tiger romance, is proving a hit for a travelling Russian zoo. Stretched out in the zoo director's van, the stripy Tsar -- whose name is a throwback to the Russian emperors of centuries past -- impatiently awaits his milk bottle. "We don't leave him in a cage -- it's too cold outside," said zoo chief Erik Airapetyan.
Miss P, a 15 inch Beagle, who won the 2015 Westminster Kennel Club Dog ShowOrganizers of the Westminster Dog Show are making room for a potentially controversial addition to this year's festivities: Cats. About 40 feline breeds are set to appear at an event affiliated with Westminster the weekend before the dog show itself. The event, "Meet the Breeds," gives the public a chance to talk with purebred breeders and connect with the animals.
A travelling zoo keeper holding a two and a half months old liger cub, Tsar, a crossbreed between a lion and a tigressStretched out in the zoo director's van, the stripy Tsar -- whose name is a throwback to the Russian emperors of centuries past -- impatiently awaits his milk bottle. "We don't leave him in a cage -- it's too cold outside," said zoo chief Erik Airapetyan. With the tawny fur of a lion cub but covered in black stripes, Tsar was born on November 11 while the zoo was on tour in southern Russia's Rostov-on-Don region.
Four rare white lion cubs born at Germany's Magdeburg zoo last Christmas made their first appearance to the outside world on Monday as the park presented the young animals to the media. Keepers weighed the three males and one female and carried out health checks on the cats, which are rare in the wild. According to the Global White Lion Protection Trust, the animals are not albinos but "a genetic rarity" of the Greater Timbavati area in South Africa's Krueger National Park.
Four white lion cubs recline in a basket at the zoo in Magdeburg, Germany, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. The five-week-old lions weigh 6 kilograms each and have developed splendidly. (Peter Gercke/dpa via AP)BERLIN (AP) — Four rare white lion cubs are intriguing visitors at Magdeburg Zoo in eastern Germany.
Organizers of the Westminster Dog Show are making room for a potentially controversial addition to this year's festivities: cats. About 40 feline breeds are set to appear at an event affiliated with Westminster the weekend before the dog show itself. The event, "Meet the Breeds," gives the public a chance to talk with purebred breeders and connect with the animals.
bobcatThe search for a 25-pound (11-kg) female bobcat that escaped from Washington's National Zoo has been called off, with officials turning to phone tips to find the elusive feline, the zoo said on Wednesday. The wild-born bobcat, Ollie, went missing on Monday and likely climbed through a hole in the mesh net that surrounds her enclosure. Searches by keepers, police and humane society volunteers have been fruitless, spokeswoman Devin Murphy said.
A 45-day-old bengal tiger cub is pictured at its enclosure at the Wild Shelter Foundation in Jayaque, 40 kilometres west of San Salvador, on January 31, 2017Four Bengal tigers have been born in an El Salvador animal park that runs an endangered-species reproduction program, the facility announced Wednesday. The cubs arrived in December to the tiger pair Lily and Papo that are being kept in the 0.6-square-mile (1.6-square-kilometer) private Furesa wildlife refuge in the southeastern town of Jayaque, the center's veterinarian, Luis Martinez, told AFP. According to the environmental protection group World Wildlife Fund, there are more than 2,500 Bengal tigers left in the wild, mostly in India.
A travelling zoo keeper holding a two and a half months old liger cub, Tsar, a crossbreed between a lion and a tigressAn extremely rare cross between a tiger and a lion has been born in a travelling zoo in southern Russia, one of only a few dozen of the animals believed to exist. Named Tsar, the two-month-old liger cub, is the offspring of a tigress Princess and lion Caesar, zoo director Erik Airapetyan told AFP. When the tigress was on heat, she didn't have any other choice," he said.
bobcatA 25-pound (11-kg) female bobcat escaped from Washington's National Zoo on Monday, zoo officials said, while warning area residents not to approach the brownish feline if they see her. Zoo officials asked anyone spotting the animal to call them.
An indigenous girl carries a monkey inside her house in their village at Xingu national park in Mato Grosso, BrazilThe worst yellow fever outbreak in decades is not just killing Brazilians, it threatens to wipe out monkeys in the Atlantic rainforest that are already close to extinction, experts warned on Tuesday. At greatest risk is the muriqui monkey, Brazil's largest primate and one of the planet's 25 most-endangered species of primates, said biologist Roberto Cabral at the Brazilian environmental agency Ibama. "The monkeys are vulnerable to yellow fever just like humans but we have vaccines to protect us, they don't," Cabral said.
After this gruesome murder, you'll never look at chimps the same way againChimps aren't exactly the soft and cuddly animals that Curious George would have you believe.
Fritz, the new polar bear cub at Berlin's TierparkBerlin's Tierpark Zoo has christened Germany's new favorite polar bear cub 'Fritz'. The little cub, born on November 3, 2016, is particularly special given that he marks the first polar bear litter at
The search was launched on Tuesday after staff at the zoo in Norfolk noticed Sunny, a 19-month-old red panda, was not in the enclosure that she shares with Thomas, a male red panda. Sunny was last seen on Monday at 5 p.m. local time. Red pandas are similar in size to a raccoon and have a reddish-brown coat of thick fur and a long tail.
Study shows dogs love reggae, my dudesDogs are extremely cool and chill, as you can tell from looking at them. And now, we have further scientific evidence that backs it up — they really dig reggae. According to a recent study from Scottish SPCA and the University of Glasgow, dogs' favorite music genres are reggae and soft rock, according to The BBC.
Rachel Carson doc tells the environmentalist's inspiring life storyBefore Rachel Carson became the mother of the modern environmental movement, she was stuck in a job that paid the bills but left her restless. A new documentary revisits Carson's days as an information specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the 1930s and '40s, where at first she filed mundane reports about the agency's conservation work.
By Claudia Farhart SYDNEY (Reuters) - An Australian zookeeper on Tuesday urged people to catch and donate deadly funnel-web spiders, to help replenish stocks of antidote running low after a spate of spider bites. The Australian Reptile Park, the country's sole supplier of funnel-web venom to antidote producers since 1981, relies on the public to hand in spiders that are milked for the venom used to produce an antidote. The anti-venom program was now at risk after too few spiders were donated last year and a recent heatwave encouraged more spider activity and bites, the park's general manager, Tim Faulkner, said on Tuesday.
Scientists are turning dragonflies into tiny cyborg dronesOne company has decided the ideal tiny drone should take its cues from the natural world of insects — specifically the dragonfly.
People shout slogans and hold placards during a demonstration against the ban on the Jallikattu bull taming ritual, and calling for a ban on animal rights organisation PETA, in Chennai on January 19, 2017Prime Minister Narendra Modi refused Thursday to overturn a Supreme Court ban on a festival featuring young men wrestling with bulls that has brought thousands onto the streets of southern India in protest. Residents of the southern state of Tamil Nadu say the Jallikattu festival is a crucial part of their culture and are demanding the ban be lifted. India's Supreme Court outlawed Jallikattu last year after a plea by animal rights groups, which have long argued that the event -- held every year in different parts of Tamil Nadu -- abuses the animals.
Skin Medication Can Be Lethal for Pets, FDA WarnsA cream used to treat skin cancer and abnormal skin lesions can be lethal for pets, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today. The agency said the medication, called fluorouracil, can make pets sick, and even kill them in some cases. "People using this medication should use care when applying and storing the medication if they are also in a household with pets, as even very small amounts could be dangerous to these animals," the FDA said in a statement.