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A detailed dive into the AI design behind the animals in Avalanche Studios' theHunter: Call of the Wild. ...
Mongolian herder Munkhbat Bazarragchaa drags two sheep, which died due to severe weather, to a pile of dead animals behind his Thousands of Mongolian herders face disastrous livestock losses from a dreaded severe weather phenomenon known as the "dzud", the Red Cross said Thursday in launching an international emergency aid appeal. Landlocked Mongolia is grappling for the second straight year with dzud conditions -- a dry summer followed by brutal winter cold that leaves livestock and other animals at risk of starvation and exposure on the country's rugged steppes. It threatens tens of thousands of herders in a country where almost half the population depends entirely on livestock for food, transportation and income, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) said.
Climate Threat to Wildlife May Have Been Massively UnderreportedMore than 700 of the world's threatened and endangered animal species may be directly affected by climate change, according to a new study — vastly more than the number of animal species scientists initially thought would face risks from global warming. Scientists had previously determined that only 7 percent of mammals and 4 percent of birds on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) "Red List" of threatened species are affected by climate change. In a comprehensive analysis of 130 previous studies on the subject, researchers found that nearly half of the world's threatened and endangered mammals and nearly a quarter of birds are already seriously impacted — more than 700 species total.
Dutch Zoo Tests 'Tinder for Orangutans' Mating ProgramThink of it like online dating, but for primates: A Dutch zoo is using a series of photographs on a screen to help one orangutan kick off the mating process. Breeding programs often involve international partnerships and long-distance travel of potential mates, so the Apenheul primate park in Apeldoorn, Netherlands, recently launched a four-year experiment dubbed "Tinder for orangutans." Rather than hope for the best once a male arrives at the zoo, researchers are first presenting pictures of the potential mates to a female orangutan to see how she reacts. "Often, animals have to be taken back to the zoo they came from without mating," Thomas Bionda, a behavioural biologist at the zoo,
Scientists are now spotting whales from outer space using satellitesA humpback whale may be a huge creature to the human eye, but they're still tough to spot from space. Until recently, the necessary high-resolution satellite technology wasn't readily available, but researchers in Western Australia are beginning to use satellite imagery to check on the size of local populations. SEE ALSO: Forget telepresence robots on wheels, Google wants telepresence drones The aim of the project is to keep tabs on Western Australia's humpback whale numbers, explained Curt Jenner, managing director of the Centre for Whale Research. "The goal of the project is ultimately to make sure this population of humpback whales, which has always historically been the largest in the world, is still viable and has recovered to its full potential," he said. The animals were hunted almost to extinction in the early to mid 20th century. While projects like this were able to find government and corporate funding in the past, that money has increasingly dried up as whale numbers rebound, Jenner said, forcing he and his research partner on this project, Michele Thums, to find a new solution. Satellite imagery of whales migrating. Image: Curt Jenner "There are no longer any budgets to send aerial survey teams of people up in planes nor people out in boats to do that population monitoring, and so we were looking for an economical solution that was low in man power," he said.
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